Ella fitzgerald with the ray charles singers when the hands of the clock pray at midnight



Never one to complain, Ella later reflected on her most difficult years with an appreciation for how they helped her to mature. She used the memories from these times to help gather emotions for performances, and felt she was more grateful for her success because she knew what it was like to struggle in life.

One of Webb's first promises had been to feature Fitzgerald on record. He got her to sing two medium-paced love songs 'I'll Chase the Blues Away' and 'Love and Kisses'. Both were recorded on June 12, 1935, and both are on the marvellous new 10-disc box set Ella Fitzgerald: The Voice of Jazz, issued by Verve Records . The 1935 combination of the A and B side was not a contender for top honours but it showed Fitzgerald to be a very promising vocalist whose intonation, diction and rhythmic phrasing were first class. She no longer sounded nervous. 

The AllMusic review of the album claimed "What's really great about the Ella and Louis version is Ella, who handles each aria with disarming delicacy, clarion intensity, or usually a blend of both... Pops sounds like he really savored each duet, and his trumpet work – not a whole lot of it, because this is not a trumpeter's opera – is characteristically good as gold. This marvelous album stands quite well on its own, but will sound best when matched with the Ray Charles/Cleo Laine version, especially the songs of the Crab Man, of Peter the Honey Man, and his wife, Lily the Strawberry Woman." [3]

In 1942, Fitzgerald left the band and began to work as a solo singer. She was signed to the Decca label, and she had several popular hit songs. She recording with other musicians like the Ink Spots , Louis Jordan , and the Delta Rhythm Boys .

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Dubbed "The First Lady of Song," Ella Fitzgerald was the most popular female jazz singer in the United States for more than half a century. In her lifetime, she won 13 Grammy awards and sold over 40 million albums. Her voice was flexible, wide-ranging, accurate and ageless. She could sing sultry ballads, sweet jazz and imitate every instrument in an orchestra. She worked with all the jazz greats, from Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Nat King Cole, to Frank Sinatra, Dizzy Gillespie and Benny Goodman. (Or rather, some might say all the jazz greats had the pleasure of working with Ella). She performed at top venues all over the world, and packed them to the hilt. Her audiences were as diverse as her vocal range. They were rich and poor, made up of all races, all religions and all nationalities. In fact, many of them had just one binding factor in common - they all loved her.


Ella Fitzgerald With The Ray Charles Singers When The Hands Of The Clock Pray At MidnightElla Fitzgerald With The Ray Charles Singers When The Hands Of The Clock Pray At MidnightElla Fitzgerald With The Ray Charles Singers When The Hands Of The Clock Pray At MidnightElla Fitzgerald With The Ray Charles Singers When The Hands Of The Clock Pray At Midnight

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